21st-Century Competencies, Technology, Technology Integration

What A Little Audio Can Do

There is something powerful about the spoken word. When it’s accompanied by a striking visual it can leave the listener thinking, wondering, looking for more. It is this auditory advantage that can bring amazing life and dynamic to your classroom. It is through such a medium that we can take our student learning to a very new and different place. Recording isn’t new to education, but it has throughout the 20th-Century been mainly a consuming experience. Continue reading

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iPad, Technology, Technology Integration

5 Ways The iPad Revolutionized Education

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The truth is, that it isn’t just the iPad. Tablet technology has revolutionized education. It has such potential to completely transform student learning, when used in a purposeful and thoughtful manner. Bonus #6 is that it’s mobile and agile unlike its laptop cousins. It is in this respect that where and how we learn is only limited to our WiFi access. You can deep sea dive with an iPad. I can’t imagine doing the same thing with a Chromebook or even a Macbook Pro.

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Education, Technology, Technology Integration

Learning Is Down! I Mean The Internet.

Can a classroom be considered a 21st-Century learning environment without internet access?

For many of our students, it seems impossible to imagine a life without internet. In school, if it’s not accessed a 1:1 device, it is at the very least via a teacher’s computer or computer lab. The more we experience the power of digital resources, the more we rely on them to support meaningful learning. The question now is how much do we rely on the internet as a tool?

What happens when the internet goes down? Does learning stop?

Continue reading

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21st-Century Competencies, Education, Technology, Technology Integration

Coding Your Story

If you asked me as a kid growing up “what’s Python?”, I would tell you it was a snake at the zoo. Today it isn’t just a slithering reptile, it’s the name of one of the most powerful coding languages ever created, and it’s the main ingredient in a program sweeping the nation.

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Meet Scratch. He’s not just a cat, he’s part of the MIT coding program “Scratch” being embraced by K-5th students and teachers alike. Continue reading

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EdTechTeacher iPad Summit, Education, Technology, Technology Integration

EdTech Is Maturing

Educational Technology is maturing, and it is without question that the instructors at EdTechTeacher, and the presenters they feature are leading the way. In 2012, I felt a whirlwind as apps arrive on the scene. Full of new features, new upgrades, they came in droves. There was so much new to be seen. As the years have passed, “1,000 Free Apps” sessions have made way for more thoughtful and intentional discussions about technology. Continue reading

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Apple™, Education, iPad, Technology, Technology Integration

Think Different, More Than Just a Choice of Device

It was 1997 and Apple challenged the world to “Think Different”This cliché is more than meets the eye, speaking more about the decision not go with the status quo device than a challenge for us as innovators and users of technology to use their devices to, think different. This is because 1997 was the same year that Apple almost went bankrupt. Twenty years later, we see Apple is a leading technology company, one who continues to push the limits of how technology can shape our future. Continue reading

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Apple™, Education, iPad, Technology, Technology Integration

Rewriting History with Book Creator

One of the challenges of teaching history is that it doesn’t change much. While there may be a discovery here and there, it is rare that any sort of drastic discovery might alter the learning experience of a student in history class. Thanks to various technology innovations like the internet and computing technology, this challenge can also be turned into history. That is if as an educator we are willing to be open to the possibility that we are not the all knowing fountain of knowledge, and that our 20-year old textbook might need an upgrade? But who can afford textbooks?!!?

Worry not! We have a classroom of historical researchers and thinkers and the tools to empower them to create their own history book.

In an 8th-grade history class, we did just that. In collaboration with Ilana Zadok, 8th-grade history teacher, we set out to challenge our students to build their own Revolutionary War publication. We wanted it to be something that is 100% student-produced with the goal that others could learn and in the end benefit from the students work. Our students set out to research various events of the Revolutionary War, focusing on primary sources and first-hand encounters. With this research in hand students because to create a window into the past. Through creative writing, photos, and student-produced films these events began to take life through the lens of the students. With all of this amazing content gathered and produced we were at a loss of where to compile it and share it out.

Book Creator to the Rescue!

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After the content was created students imported it into Book Creator and used its features to layout an interactive book full of written, visual, and audial expressions. Each group of students then created an assessment quiz at the end to demonstrate their understanding of the content and to challenge their peers to delve deep into their work. In the end students learned from their peers gaining a deep understanding of a specific Revolutionary event and a general overview of the entire war. With the success of this unit, there was so much more accomplished besides the memorization of battles and soldiers. Students developed important skills in communication, both visually, and verbally. Collaboration, Cooperation, Organization, Critical Thinking and Problem Solving all played a role in this production.

The end result was an 110-page publication that pushed the limits of student learning and technology itself. The Book Creator file was 1GB and due to its size would not export from the iPad. With a little bit of praying and 4 hours of work on my part, I was able to get the file down to 610MB without sacrificing one iota of student work and airdrop it to the students iPads to experience their hard work first hand.

Here are a few screenshots and videos from the publication.

Enjoy.Screen Shot 2015-07-27 at 11.50.15 AM Screen Shot 2015-07-27 at 11.50.40 AM

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